5 more commonly confused words

 

 

 

 

I’ve got myself all out of sync. The Wolf Pack Chapter 7 should have been today and this should have been next week. Don’t know how that happened. Still, I’ll get back to normal next month, I hope.

Since I started writing about these words, more and more are coming to my notice. I suppose it’s because I’m now looking out for them. Some can be quite amusing, like in a previous blog when I talked about vicious and viscous.
A pupil wanted to say that a liquid became more VISCOUS, i.e. thicker and less runny. In fact he said it became more VICIOUS.

Here are this week’s words.

 Advise/Advice.

Advise is a verb. It is what you do. You advise someone.
e.g. I would advise you not to put all your money in the same shares.

Advice is a noun. It is what you give.
e.g. My advice to you is not to put all your money in the same shares.

 Adieu/ado.
This one I was surprised to see. It was in a blog post and the blogger said ‘And so without further adieu…’

Anyway, just in case he isn’t the only one, here’s the difference.

Adieu is French. It means Goodbye.
e.g. Well. I guess I’ll be going, so it’s adieu.’

Ado means fuss or action.
e.g. And so without further ado, we will go over to our correspondent in Washington.

 Council/Counsel

Council is an advisory or deliberative body.
e.g. The town council has decided to impose a fine for people who drop litter.

Counsel is a barrister (Queen’s counsel) or advice given.
e.g. He counselled me to think hard about what I was about to do.

 Good/Well
Good is an adjective. It describes a noun.
e.g. Jack is a good boy.

Well is an adverb. It describes a verb.
e.g. Janice did the task we set her very well.

If someone asks you how you are, unless you are saying that you are a good person, you cannot reply ‘I’m good,’ it should be ‘I’m well.’ You are describing your state of being, and ‘being’ is a verb.

 Accept/Except

Accept is what you do when you receive a gift.
e.g. When Fred gave Janet the gift, she accepted it gratefully.

Except is to exclude.
e.g. We all went to the cinema except for Judy, who was busy that evening.

I hope you have enjoyed these five further pairs of words. I hope so because I have more to come!

Please feel free to leave your comments below.

A reminder that I am giving a free copy of The Wolf Pack, Part 1 of The Wolves of Vimar, to everyone who signs up to receive advance warnings of new releases, freebies and other offers. Just click on the link.

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