All posts by V.M.Sang

I was born and educated in the north west of England. I trained as a teacher in Manchester and taught in Salford, Lancashire, Hampshire and Croydon. I write fantasy novels currently. I also make cards, knit, crochet, tat, do cross stitch and paint. I enjoy walking on the Downs, cycling and kayaking. I do not enjoy housework, but like cooking.

Audio book live

I am excited to announce that The Never-Dying Man has now been released as an audio book. This means that both Book 1 of The Wolves of Vimar (The Wolf Pack) and Book 2, (The Never-Dying Man) are both available as audio books.

Book 3 (Wolf Moon) is not yet scheduled for release as an audio book, but I hope it won’t be too long.

I am currently doing NaNoWriMo and working on Book 4, Immortal’s Death. I hope to have it ready for the publisher by the beginning of 2022.

For those of you who are not writers, NaNoWriMo stands for National Novel Writing Month. It was begun by a couple of writers in the US who challenged each other to write a novel (50,000 words) during the 30 days of November.

The idea took off, and now it is an international event, with many authors trying beat this challenge.

Currently I am well behind where I should be. Things keep cropping up and derailing me. I doubt if I’ll finish the 50,000 words. (This is the lowest number of words deemed to make a novel.)

With regard to the audio book, I have some codes for free copies. If you would like one. PM me: vivienne.sang@gmail.com telling me if you are in the US or the UK as the codes are different.

The Wolves of Vimar books are available as ebooks, but also in a variety of other formats, including paperback, hardback and large print.

If you wish to buy, you can click on the book cover in the sidebar or the titles in this post, to take you to Amazon where you are, and then pick the format you wish.

The cover for your exclusive short story.


Would you like a free, exclusive story? I will send you one if you click the button below. This will take you to my sign up form for my quarterly newsletter.

Don’t worry that you will get spammed. I hate spam as much as you do. You can unsubscribe at any time, even immediately you have received the story, if you wish.

Happy Halloween

Image by Pete Linforth from Pixabay

I’m a bit late posting this, I know, but Halloween hasn’t gone yet. In fact it’s tonight the ‘ghoulies and ghosties and long legged beasties’ (to quote Robbie Burns) are active.

I thought I’d post one of my Halloween poems, so here it is.

Samhain

Don’t go near the graveyard, darling.
Samhain is tonight.
Don’t go near the graveyard, darling.
The dead will walk this night.

Keep your candle burning, darling.
Keep it glowing bright.
Keep your candle burning darling.
Be sure it gives you light.

The bonfires have been lit, darling.
To fill the dark with light.
The bonfires have been lit, darling.
Their flames reach such a height.

Put your home fire out, darling.
Be sure to do it right.
Put your home fire out, darling.
From bonfires we’ll re-light.

Put food by the door, darling.
Leave it in plain sight.
Put food by the door, darling,
For our dead to have a bite.

Do not be afraid, darling.
They see that we’re alright.
Do not be afraid, darling.
No harm from them tonight.

But evil spirits come, darling.
We must put them to flight.
But evil spirits come, darling.
Them we must try to fight.

Go and watch the bonfires, darling.
Stand in their bright light.
Go and watch the bonfires, darling
To keep us safe this night.

I wrote this after doing research for Vengeance of a Slave. The Celtic people believed the veil between the worlds of the living and the dead were thin on this particular night, and the dead, and other spirits could pass through.

Many of these spirits were friendly: our loved ones, gone before. The people set a place at the table for their dead relatives.

But the thin veil also allowed evil spirits to pass, and they needed to be guarded against. They shunned the light, and so that is why the people built bonfires. There may have been sacrifices at this time, to appease the gods, too.

People put out their fires and took a brand from the bonfire to re-light them for a prosperous year.

This has passed from then to today. We, in Britain, have bonfires on November 5th (which may have been the actual date of Samhain. It is thought it was celebrated midway between the autumn equinox and the winter solstice.)

Our modern use of lit pumpkins comes from the candles people put in their windows to frighten away the evil spirits, who hated the light.

I hope you enjoyed my poem. Please leave a comment in the box.

I am doing Nanowrimo this year. I didn’t do it last year, but thought I’d have another go this time.

For those of you who aren’t writers, Nanowrimo (National Novel Writing Month), is held every November. It is now an international thing, and many writers take part from all over the world. The challenge is to write 50,000 words in the 30 days of November. (50,000 words is the lowest number of words for a novel.)

As a result of my entry, I will be taking a break from my weekly blog in order to attempt to meet the challenge. This doesn’t mean there won’t be any posts. I might well reblog someone else’s, and also I’ll probably pop in to give you a breakdown of my progress–or lack of it!

See you all in December!

If you would like to join my quarterly newsletter, and get an exclusive free story by me, click the button below.

This is a story of a mysterious haunting, but it doesn’t appear to be by a ghost.

A Short History Of Climate Change Conferences #history

Geoff has excelled himself this time with a topical tale. (Or is it topical, being so far in the past.)

‘Where’s dad?’

‘Watching the clouds.’

‘It’s verging on paranoia, you know.’

‘I know that but try telling him. The Big Guy says this, the Big Guy says that. You know what he’s like when he’s had one of those apocalyptical tablets. Sits by the letter box waiting for the post to update him.’

‘Has he said what the Big Guy was danging on about this time?’

‘Nope, only it’s about the weather and we’ll need a bigger boat. Oh and Ham’s been sent to talk to the chap who runs the circus to see if he can source two lions, two tigers and a couple of mandolins.’

Review of Hydrosphere Rising by Philip J. Rutherford.

Overview.

This book has a serious message within an exciting story. It is set in the future when, because we have failed to act quickly enough on climate change, the seas have risen by 5 metres and devastated the coastline of Australia, where the story is set.

Blurb

The year is 2120 and sea levels have risen five metres in the last hundred years. The coast is now also lashed by superstorms. Owen is a teenager who grew up on the flooded coastline of Australia. He sets out on a journey to find a missing marine biologist but is about to come up against powerful forces that will push his mind and body beyond their limits. Owen must battle both internal and external monsters to solve the mystery of Evelyn’s disappearance before these forces change the ocean forever and threaten the future of the entire planet.

Owen likes writing poetry (or he used to) but he’ll need to revive every last one of his poetic skills to find the clues that will guide him. Time is running out but why is poetry suddenly so important?

This book has used the latest topographic maps and climate science to imagine what Australia could really be like in a hundred years if climate change continues. It also explores the human response to these changes. What are the implications for the rest of the world?

Story

Owen is haunted by the disappearance of his older sister, and blames himself, although he was not in anyway at fault. This guilt leads him to go in search of his sister’s teacher who has disappeared.
What he thought was a straightforward adventure turns out to be something far more serious and threatening to the whole world.

Characters

The character of Owen is well-drawn. He is a young man of eighteen, with all the adventurous spirit of one of that age. He is a little lacking in confidence, though, due to the guilt he feels over his sister’s disappearance. It is because of this that he sets off to find Evelyn, her teacher. His character develops through his adventures, and at the end he has changed.

Owen is the main character, and there are few others as Owen is mainly alone on his boat.

Writing

Although nothing grammatically wrong with the writing, except for a few typos, I felt that it could be made so much better and stronger. With some tweaking here and there, we would feel much closer to Owen and the action.

Conclusion

I enjoyed reading this story. It kept me guessing all through as to where, or if, he would find Evelyn, and what he would discover when he did. I enjoyed the poetry, which gave the story an extra dimension, and turned out to be important in the end.
The twist at the end surprised me.
I give it 4* for the story, losing 1* for the writing.

Please add your comments in the comments box. If you’ve read this, or any books like it, what do you think of them? Do you think such stories help in the serious condition the world finds itself in?

The Stones of Fire and Water

Image by Iván Tamás from Pixabay

Here is an idea that would make excellent Christmas presents for a young adult in your family, or even for a not-so-young adult!

Did you get your free copy of The Stones of Earth and Air at the beginning of the month? If so, you can now get the second (and final) ebook for only 0.99 £ or $ from today until 29th.

Find out if Pettic manages to get the gems from the worlds of Fire and Water. What are the quests he will have to undertake in these worlds? (If you like dragons and mermaids, you’ll like this book.)

Will he be able to use these keys to rescue Crown Prince Torren? And who has imprisoned the prince? If he does manage to release him, how can anyone know the real prince from the doppleganger?

Click on the button to go to Amazon where you are.

If you missed the freebie earlier, you can get a copy of The Stones of Earth and Air by clicking the following button.

Both books are available as audio books, and in other formats, too.

Evenings are now drawing in, and we will have the long, dark nights to contend with. What do we do? We sit around the fire and read a good book.

Escape from the cold by reading.

Wolf Moon

is also on offer for 0.99 £ or $ from today until 29th. Follow the adventures of half of the group that calls itself Wolf as they try to escape from the enemies pursuing them after their friends have been captured. (Read about that in The Never-Dying Man.)

Follow them deep into the mountain caves where a surprise awaits them.

Get your copy by clicking on the button below.

Although the third book in the Wolves of Vimar series, this book can be read as a standalone.

If you buy either of these books (or any others) please consider leaving a comment on Amazon. Comments and reviews are very important to authors. There are millions of books, and it’s very difficult to get people to find books they’ll enjoy, so reviews and comments are useful to them as well.

Please leave any comments in the comments box.

BIRD IN THE GOLDEN CAGE

A wonderful analogy of relationships from Candles online.

Candles Online

A beautiful bird just commenced it’s flight in the sky. New found freedom made the bird flutter with joy. But sighting the possible dangers predators could pose the little bird was carefully put in a cage.

Cage was made of gold. It was spacious and decorated with beautiful embellishments. Food was served in a golden plate so was the water. Bird thought may be I was foolish to loiter aimlessly, may be this is my haven which is nothing less than heaven.

It flew happily within the boundaries of the cage covering every inch of it, devouring the delicacies off the plate. It began to croon happily and fearlessly. And that’s when it received it first shock.

“You are making a noise, stop it at once” boomed a thundering cane that stuck the cage, it was a mere harbinger of the problem in foresight. The bird went silent and it…

View original post 496 more words

My latest offer to you.

This will be of necessity, rather brief, as I’m on holiday in the South of Spain, so don’t have access to pretty stuff.

Anyway, the important thing is that the ebook version of The Never-Dying Man,. Book 2 in The Wolves of Vimar series, is available from today until 20th for a mere 0.99 (£ or $ ).

I can’t understand it, but book 1, The Wolf Pack, and book 3, Wolf Moon, are creating more sales than book 2. Who buys books 1 and 3, but misses out book 2? Some important info gets missed out.

Please leave your comments in the comments box. I love hearing from you.

And if you’ve read any of my books, I would be delighted if you would post a brief review on Amazon, Goodreads or anywhere else. It only needs to say if you enjoyed it or not, and if you wish to add why, that’s a bonus.

Autumn in Sussex. A Poem

As it’s now Autumn, officially, I thought I’d post a poem about that season. I think I’ve already posted it previously, but I’ve new followers who haven’t seen it before.

So here it is.

The Downs are wreathed in mist, like smoke
From a dying fire.
The leaves are turning red and gold
Like flames upon a pyre.

Spring’s little lambs are grown to sheep
The swallows they have flown.
The blossoms that the summer brought
Their petals all have thrown.

Now autumn’s bounty fills the woods,
The hedgerows are ablaze
With hips and haws in colours bright
The senses to amaze.

The smoke from wood fires fills the air,
The scent of autumn true.
The autumn sun is cooler now
And mornings filled with dew.

The cobwebs shine with dewdrops bright.
The spider in her lair
Thinks nothing of the rainbow hue
That scatters in the air.

And children kick the fallen leaves
As laughingly they run
To gather conkers, shiny brown,
Gleaming in the sun.

We gather blackberries from the hedge
And apples from on high.
Up in the tree they ripen now
To turn into a pie.

But autumn sometimes has a kick
And the rain it lashes down.
The wind, it howls within the eaves
And through the trees doth moan.

A REVIEW OF GLASTONBURY BY BRIAN L. PORTER.

Overview.

This is a book that is well worth a read. It is exciting and keeps the reader turning the page.

Blurb

After millionaire Malcolm Capshaw hires Joe Cutler and his team to search for a fabled artifact, they enter a maze of lies, murder and betrayal.

The real purpose of their search is soon exposed, as an old London crime family displays an unusual interest in an ancient town where Christianity laid its roots in England.

Aided by the enigmatic professor Lucius Doberman, Joe and his team must solve the ancient mystery that lies in the shadows of Glastonbury, or die trying.

Story

This begins as the story of a search for King Arthur’s sword, Excalibur. A business man, Malcolm Capshaw, has come into possession of a map perporting to show where some of the remaining knights had buried the sword to save it from coming into the possession of enemies.
Sadly, though, the names of places, and even the terrain, have changed since then.
So he employs a company of surveyors to help locate it using the latest technology.
Of course, it’s not as straightforward as that. There are twists and turns of the plot, and the final twist at the end came as a surprise to me.

Characters

Mr Porter has drawn his characters well. I particularly liked Winston Fortune, one of the team searching. He has a great sense of humour. And I disliked Walter Graves, which I suppose I was supposed to as he’s set up as a villain. In fact, I liked all of Joe Cutler’s team. They seemed like real people with all their faults as well as good points.

Writing

The writing is, on the whole, good. A few unnecessary uses of the word ‘just’, but apart from that, no major problems.

Conclusion

I enjoyed this story immensely and give it 5*

Have you read this book? If so, what did you think? What other books have you read about Excalibur?

Please let us know in the comments box.