For Your Information

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I thought everyone should be aware of this and so I’m reblogging it instead of my usual post today.

via For Your Information

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How to build your world: Economy

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A most interesting and useful post for those of us building new worlds.

via How to build your world: Economy

How to Joint a Chicken

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1. Use a fresh chicken that has not been frozen if you want to freeze the joints.
2. Remove the string that is trussing the chicken, if there is any.

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3. Remove any feathers that have been left on the bird.
4. Cut off the end of the wings. They have very little, if any, meat, and so are going to be removed after cooking, anyway.

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5. Remove the legs. To do this, cut the skin , then bend the leg backwards. This breaks the joint allowing you to see where to cut.

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6. If you want, you can separate the thighs from the drumsticks. this depends on preference, or the size of the chicken. With a small chicken, you might want to leave them whole

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7. Remove the wings, taking some of the breast with it. To locate the joint, use your finger. It’s easier to find with some of the breast there Wings have very little meat on them. and this makes them a bit more substantial.

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8. To remove the breast, feel for the breastbone with your finger, then, with a sharp, pointed knife, cut straight down until you meet the main carcass.

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9. Then, using the point of your knife, gently loosen the meat from the carcass, keeping as close to the bones as possible.

 

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10. Do the same on the other side.
11. Don’t throw away the carcass. There is still quite a lot of meat on it if you search. I cut as much off as I can, then freeze the bits. The next chicken I joint, I add the bits to the bag. Remember to date the first lot, though, so you know when to eat them by. You can use these in stir fries.

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12. Don’t forget to freeze all the joints immediately. Freeze the carcass as well and use it to make stock for casseroles, gravies and soup.

Here are the joints you will now have in front of you, including the carcass that I’ve cut in half for freezing/

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To find out some recipes as to how to use these joints, why not buy Viv’s Family Recipes? Click on the picture on the side bar and you will be taken to Amazon in your own country or follow the link above.

I love hearing from you, so please add a comment.

A Question

I don’t usually use WordPress as a means of asking a question, but I’ve just realised I don’t have a reblog button on my site.

I’ve made sure that the reblog button is checked on the setup page, but it’s still not there, and I suspect, never has been.

The forums are no help. The only ones that talk about it are people whose wordpress account is hosted by someone else. (Why would you do that?) WordPress does not add a reblog button for those, but my account is not hosted by someone else.

I can’t find anywhere on the forums to ask a question either, and you cannot contact anyone from WordPress directly. That is bad!

Does anyone out there know why I’ve not got this button even though the tick box is checked, and how I can get one?

Words That Don’t Follow Normal Plural Rules

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Today I’m going to discuss a few words that don’t form the plural by adding the letter ‘s’. These words come mainly from foreign ‘imports’, although a lot are very old. Some people are confused by these words and use the plural as a singular.
So here we go.

 Singular: Bacterium        Plural: Bacteria
 Singular: Phenomenon        Plural: Phenomena
 Singular: Medium            Plural: Media
 Singular: Datum            Plural: Data
 Singular: Criterion            Plural: Criteria
 Singular: Cactus            Plural: Cacti
 Singular: Fungus            Plural: Fungi
 Singular: Stadium            Plural: Stadia
 Singular: Nucleus            Plural: Nuclei
 Singular: Syllabus            Plural: Syllabi
 Singular: Focus            Plural: Foci
 Singular: Thesis            Plural: Theses
 Singular: Crisis            Plural: Crises
 Singular: Index            Plural: Indices
 Singular: Appendix        Plural: Appendices

It is becoming more acceptable to hear ‘stadiums’, ‘syllabuses’ and ‘indexes’, although they grate on me, personally, but my least favourites are when I hear ‘criteria’, ‘bacteria’, ‘fungi’ and ‘phenomena’ used as singular nouns. Grrrrr!

Now for some that don’t change for the plural.

 sheep
 deer
 fish (although the word ‘fishes’ can be used if referring to a number of different types of the creatures. e.g. There was a great variety of fishes swimming around on the reef.)
 aircraft
 moose
 offspring
 species
 salmon
 trout

Now what about those that are completely different in the plural? Here we have the following:

 Singular: Child            Plural: Children
 Singular: Man            Plural: Men
 Singular: Woman            Plural: Women
 Singular: Mouse            Plural: Mice
 Singular: Goose            Plural: Geese (N.B. The plural of ‘mongoose’ is not ‘mongeese’, but ‘mongooses’. Wierd, I know, but that’s the English language for you.)
 Singular: Die             Plural: Dice
 Singular: Foot             Plural: Feet
 Singular: Louse             Plural: Lice
 Singular: Ox             Plural: Oxen
 Singular: Person             Plural: People
 Singular: Tooth             Plural: Teeth

I hope this has helped some of you, at least. I would like to know if there are any I’ve forgotten, or about any that personally grate on you when you hear them misused.

 

Help Requested

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I’ve written a book under the pen name of Emily Littler.

It’s a historical novel set in the time of Roman Britain. I decided to put it up on Kindle Scout. Kindle Scout is exactly what it says. Kindle scouting for authors who they then publish (rather than the author self-publishing.) They act just like the mainstream publishers in that they give an advance, (although small!) and do all the formatting and marketing as well as producing an audio version and foreign language translations.

In order to select the books, they hold a ballot. The book (s) with the most recommends will be accepted. All you need to do is click on the link below and then click on the button to nominate or recommend my book.

You can read extracts from it before you click, so you’re not nominating something you’ve not seen.

Please find a few seconds to help me. The link is below.

https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/UZ8KQW66M6H8/

Thanks
Viv Sang

Some common Grammar mistakes.

I apologise for being a few hours late with this week’s blog.

 

Today’s post is from Clancy Tucker’s blog   https://clancytucker.blogspot.co.uk/2016/12/18-december-2016-common-grammar-mistakes.html/

I found I couldn’t reblog it as it stands so I copied and pasted it instead. I hope Clancy doesn’t mind. I asked him about reblogging and he said it was fine, but his reblog only goes to Blogger.

Do visit his blog. It’s very interesting. He posts on a variety of things including some of his photography, which is wonderful, information about famous people, historical events, British slang and of course, grammar mistakes.

COMMON GRAMMAR MISTAKES

G’day folks,

None of us are perfect in the English language. I often see mistakes, especially spelling mistakes on advertisements, and on TV. Here are a few that might help, courtesy of Jon Gingerich.

 

Who and Whom

This one opens a big can of worms. “Who” is a subjective — or nominative — pronoun, along with “he,” “she,” “it,” “we,” and “they.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the subject of a clause. “Whom” is an objective pronoun, along with “him,” “her,” “it”, “us,” and “them.” It’s used when the pronoun acts as the object of a clause. Using “who” or “whom” depends on whether you’re referring to the subject or object of a sentence. When in doubt, substitute “who” with the subjective pronouns “he” or “she,” e.g., Who loves you? cf., He loves me. Similarly, you can also substitute “whom” with the objective pronouns “him” or “her.” e.g., I consulted an attorney whom I met in New York. cf., I consulted him.

Which and That 

This is one of the most common mistakes out there, and understandably so. “That” is a restrictive pronoun. It’s vital to the noun to which it’s referring.  e.g., I don’t trust fruits and vegetables that aren’t organic. Here, I’m referring to all non-organic fruits or vegetables. In other words, I only trust fruits and vegetables that are organic. “Which” introduces a relative clause. It allows qualifiers that may not be essential. e.g., I recommend you eat only organic fruits and vegetables, which are available in area grocery stores. In this case, you don’t have to go to a specific grocery store to obtain organic fruits and vegetables. “Which” qualifies, “that” restricts. “Which” is more ambiguous however, and by virtue of its meaning is flexible enough to be used in many restrictive clauses. e.g., The house, which is burning, is mine. e.g., The house that is burning is mine.

 

 Lay and Lie

This is the crown jewel of all grammatical errors. “Lay” is a transitive verb. It requires a direct subject and one or more objects. Its present tense is “lay” (e.g., I lay the pencil on the table) and its past tense is “laid” (e.g., Yesterday I laid the pencil on the table). “Lie” is an intransitive verb. It needs no object. Its present tense is “lie” (e.g., The Andes mountains lie between Chile and Argentina) and its past tense is “lay” (e.g., The man lay waiting for an ambulance). The most common mistake occurs when the writer uses the past tense of the transitive “lay” (e.g., I laid on the bed) when he/she actually means the intransitive past tense of “lie” (e.g., I lay on the bed).

 

Clancy’s comment: Hope these help.