Tag Archives: blogging

How WordPress Powers the Internet (Infographic)

A fascinating insight into WordPress, including its history.

via How WordPress Powers the Internet (Infographic)

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How to upload to Instagram from your pc. (without additional software)

Apologies for the lateness of this post. Don’t know what happened. I thought I’d scheduled it, but apparently I hadn’t. Or I logged out too soon or something. Anyway, here is the promised post about uploading to Instagram from your pc.

It is not essential to buy, or even use free software to post to Instagram from your pc. Here is how you can do it.

I apologise for the pictures. I don’t have a print screen button on my keyboard, so had to use my camera. For some of them it chose to flash, so there’s a reflection of the flash.

First open Google Chrome and click on the 3 dots at the top right. You should then get this drop-down menu.

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When you’ve done that, the following will appear.

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Click again on the 3 dots and you should get the following:

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Click on More Tools, then on Developer tools. You will then get this window.

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Look at the top and you will see a symbol representing a phone and a tablet. It’s second from the left as shown here. When you click on it itshould turn blue.

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Click on the BLUE address that comes up to get this screen.

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Click on the x button at the top of the righthand window to close it. Be careful not to accidentally close Chrome or you’ll have to start again!

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Now you can click on the + sign at the bottom of the instagram window to add your photos from your pc.

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I hope you found this useful. I was delighted when I found I didn’t need additional software, If you want to see what I’ve uploaded from my pc, go to https://www.instagram.com/v.m.sang

If you did find it useful, please add a comment in the box. Or even if you didn’t!

How to write a book review for Amazon.

First of all, may I make 2 apologies.

First, the link for the free copy of The Wolf Pack did not work. It is now working. Don’t forget the offer finishes on 22nd, so don’t miss out. You can get it by clicking here.

Second, might I apologise for posting late this week.I was away last week and did not have the chance to write a post. anyway, here it is now.

Book reviews are important to authors. Once upon a time, before Amazon and the Internet, (Yes, there was such a time!) the only way authors got their books known about was, in the first instance, by professional reviews in the press, and by word of mouth. People told their friends they’d just read this great book, and their friends should buy it and read it, too.

Then came Amazon. Amazon allows readers to comment on the books they read, and all the world has the ability to see those reviews. (Well, almost. I had a review in India that can’t be seen here in the UK, and I have to post reviews separately in the UK and USA.)

Readers read those reviews and they help them to decide if they want to read a book. that’s great. Unfortunately, those people who write reviews are few and far between. Amazon also only adds books to the ‘People who bought this also bought,’ at the bottom of the page, if a book has 25 reviews.

I think the problem is that pwoplw think writing a book review is arduous. They remember having to write them at school and think it’s the same.

Well, it isn’t.

Writing a book review can be simple and a matter of minutes. I want to help people to get to grips with it so we, as authors, can get more reviews. It’s the main way our books our found. No one can read a book, no matter how good, if they don’t know it’s there.

Here are a few tips to get you started.

  • First,go to the book’s page and click ‘write a review’ (or ‘be the first to review this book)
  • Add the number of stars you want to award.
  • You need a title. Simply something like ‘An excellent read’, or ‘A dreadful book’. Something simple that sums up what you think.
  • In the main body of the review, you do not need to be complicated. Here are a few questions you might consider when reviewing
  • Did I like the book?
  • Was it well-written?
  • Were the characters believable?
  • Did I care about them?
  • Was the plot believable?
  • How easy did I find it to read?
  • Did I become engrossed in the book?

You do not need to answer all of the questions, just three of four would be enough, I think.

I hope this encourages you to write reviews on the books you read, positive and negative.

Thank you for reading this.

Leave a comment in the comments box, or feel free to share this post with your friends and followers. I love hearing from you, and what you think.

 

 

We Will Remember Them

I posted this poem once before, but have decided to post it again as on Sunday it’s 100 years since the Armistice . I hope you enjoy it.

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WE WILL REMEMBER THEM.

I’ll never truly understand
How World War I began.
The death of Archduke Ferdinand
Started the deaths of many more,
The young, the old, the rich, the poor.
All died with guns in hand.

My Grandad went with Uncle Jim 02grandad
And Our Poor Willie, too.
They sent them off, singing a hymn.
Grandad went to Gallipoli,
Uncle Jim left his love, Polly.
Gas in trenches did kill him.

I cannot see, in my mind’s eye
Grandad with gun in hand.
A peaceful man, sent out to die.
He fought for us, for you and me
So we can live and so that we
Safely in our beds may lie.

015gtunclewilly1Grandad came home, and Willie too,
But millions more did not.
Their duty they all had to do.
They died in fear, in noise, in blood.
Everything was caked in mud.
Yet in those fields the poppies grew.

The War to end all wars, they said,
So terrible were the deaths.
The youth of Europe all lay dead.
Yet 21 short years to come
Another war. Once more a gun
In young men’s hands brought death.

One hundred years have passed since then.
What have we learned? Not much!
Too many men are killing men.
Wars still abound around the world.
Bombs and missiles still are hurled
At those who disagree with them.

In The Haunted House. A poem for Hallowe’en

I wrote this poem for a Hallowe’en poetry contest. Wish me luck.

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The wind it blows cold
Like ice down my back.
I try to be bold,
But courage I lack.
In the haunted house.

It seemed such a lark
When we set off tonight.
But now it’s gone dark
And we shiver with fright
In the haunted house.

Jane said. ‘We’ll have fun
On Hallowe’en night.’
But when solw footsteps come
She screams out in fright
In the haunted house.

‘Let’s take candles, said Pete.
More authentic for light.
And something to eat
If we’re staying all night
In the haunted house.’

Jack thinks it’s a game
Till the candles blow out.
Not one single flame.
He gave a loud shout
In the haunted house.

The temperature sinks.
‘That means ghosts are here,’
Said Pete, who still thinks
There’s nothing to fear
In the haunted house.

The door starts to creak.
It opens so slow.
Our knees feel so weak.
I wish we could go
From the haunted house.

But nothing is there
As we huddle in fear.
Not one of us dare
To get up and peer
In the haunted house.

All night there are groans.
We hear footsteps, we swear,
And the rattle of bones.
Something is there
In the haunted house.

We laugh at our fear
As we make our way home.
In daylight it’s clear
No spirits do roam
In the haunted house.

The noises we heard?
Just the sounds of a house
Cooling down, and a bird.
Not one single ghost
In the haunted house.

 

I hope you enjoyed this poem as much as I enjoyed writing it. Please leave a comment in the comments section. I love to hear from you.

Elven Evening Hymn from The Wolf Pack

During their travels to find Sauvern’s Sword, the group calling themselves The Wolf Pack found themselves in the homeland of the Elves. Here they heard the beautiful sunset hymn the Elves sang each evening.

Here is that hymn, with a translation from the Elvish for those of you who are not proficient in that language.

 

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‘Ah equillin ssishinisi
Qua vinillaquishio quibbrous
Ahoni na shar handollesno
As nas brollenores.

Ah equilin bellamana
Qua ssishinisi llanarones
As wma ronalliores
Shi nos Grillon prones.

Ah equilin dama Grillon
Pro llamella shilonores
As nos rellemorres
Drapo weyishores.
Yam shi Grillon yssilores
Grazlin everr nos pronores
Wama vinsho prolle-emo
Lli sha rallemorres.’
Translation

“Oh star of the evening
Shining brightly
You give us hope
In the deepening night.

Oh beauteous star
Who heralds the evening
You tell us all
That Grillon guards us

Oh Grillon’s star
As you sink westwards
Return again
To guard the dawn.

Ensure that Grillon
Through darkness keep us
Safe from all evil
Until the morn.”’

Please feel free to leave a comment. I love hearing from you.

An Interview with Basalt Strongarm from The Wolf Pack

After much persuasion, I managed to get an interview with Basalt, the dwarf friend of Carthinal.

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Me: Good morning, Basalt. Thank you for giving me your time.

Basalt: Hmm! I’m very busy. I hope you don’t intend to be too long.

Me. No, this shouldn’t take more than a few minutes. Just trying to find a bit about you.

Basalt: Well, what do you want to know?

Me: You’ve lived in Grosmer for a long time, but you weren’t born here, were you?

Basalt: No, I was born in the Dwarven homeland of Graal. It’s at the southern end of the Western Mountains, you know. As far away from those flighty elves as we can get.

Me: But one of your friends is an elf, and another a half elf. Surely you can’t think all of them are flighty/

Basalt: Did I say I thought of them all as flighty? Of course not. Asphodel and Carthinal are just normal folks. So is Yssa. But they will give their children such unpronounceable names.

Me, smiling: So you are not against all elves, then?

Basalt: It’s not me you should be worrying about, but the other dwarves who still think like that. I’m willing to accept that elves, like dwarves and people, have all kinds of folk.

Me: Tell me about your early life,

Basalt: I was my parents’ second child. My brother, Schist, is much older than I am. My parents, Granite and Emerald, had given up hope of another child, then I came along. I guess they spoiled me because of it.

Me: How did Schist react to your birth.

Basalt: He was very good to me. He played with me, looked after me when my parents were down the mine and we got on very well.

Me: Why did you leave Graal then?

Basalt: Everything was fine until my parents were killed in a mine collapse. Then Schist took over the running of the mine. (It belonged to my parents, see). We were supposed to be joint owners, but then she came along.

Me: She?

Basalt: Opal. She set her sights at him when she realised he would be part owner of the mine and rich. They got married, and gradually she poisoned him against me. They gave me all the worst and most dangerous jobs.

Me: But if Schist was so fond of you, how could she manage to turn him.

Basalt: Well, when our parents died, I was still only a little whippersnapper. I’d only just started my apprenticeship. Opal argued that as I was not a qualified miner, and had not worked to build up the mine as had Schist, then it was unfair that I should have equal shares with him. Somehow she managed to convince him. I think she hoped that by giving me dangerous jobs she hoped I’d be killed. So I left.

Me: And made your way to Grosmer where, I believe, you learned the trade of metalworking.

Basalt nodded: And I’ve never regretted it. I love working with metal–making beautiful things as well as useful ones. I also taught myself to carve wood, I make toys for my friends’ children, and I made an amulet for each member of The Wolf Pack, indicating their character as well as showing they are members.

Me: Well, I’ll let you get back to your work. Thank you for agreeing to this interview.

Basalt: Well, I’ll be off. Work to finish. Goodbye.

An update on my work.

A brief post today.

I’ve had a problem with Book 4 of The Wolves of Vimar. I started to write it, then moved away from it to try to finish the 2nd book in my historical novel series, The History of a Family Through the Ages.

I decided to continue with it, but I’d lost much of it. Where? No idea. I started to rewrite it from where It ended, then I found, in my downloads (how did it get there?) a copy. Hooray, I thought. Found it. But when I read it through, a chunk in the middle was missing, and a chapter at the end of where I’d reached.

Now how can anyone explain that?

Update on the next historical novel. It’s finished, but undergoing rewrites and critiqueing. It’s potentially the best yet.

Feel free to make a comment. I enjoy hearing from you.