Tag Archives: history

New Historical Novel

I’ve just published Vengeance of a Slave, my Historical Novel set in Roman Britain, on Amazon. Since it’s a very different genre, I’ve written it under a pen name.

The book is available for pre-order and will be published on April 29th. You can pre-order it as you would an already published book, from Amazon.

If you want to have an idea of the book, then you can read an extract on http://emilynovels1.wordpress.com/ on Saturday of next week.bookcover2

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Help Requested

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I’ve written a book under the pen name of Emily Littler.

It’s a historical novel set in the time of Roman Britain. I decided to put it up on Kindle Scout. Kindle Scout is exactly what it says. Kindle scouting for authors who they then publish (rather than the author self-publishing.) They act just like the mainstream publishers in that they give an advance, (although small!) and do all the formatting and marketing as well as producing an audio version and foreign language translations.

In order to select the books, they hold a ballot. The book (s) with the most recommends will be accepted. All you need to do is click on the link below and then click on the button to nominate or recommend my book.

You can read extracts from it before you click, so you’re not nominating something you’ve not seen.

Please find a few seconds to help me. The link is below.

https://kindlescout.amazon.com/p/UZ8KQW66M6H8/

Thanks
Viv Sang

Update on my writing

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Well, yesterday I heard that Viv’s Family Recipes is now available in a paperback edition. You can buy it from Amazon. http://www.amazo.com/ http://amazon.co.uk/ or your local amazon site.

 

I sent the manuscript of Elemental Worlds off to the editor, so things are beginning to move on that one. I think it’s the best one yet. No ideas as to when it will be availabe though. I’ll keep you in touch. We need to agree a cover, too. As soon as we pick one, I’ll reveal it to you all for comments.

On February 10th you can get The Wolf Pack free from Creativia, and on February 14th, Viv’s Family Recipes is also free. Take advantage of these offers and many more from 1st to 14th February. You can see the books at Sahara Foley’s website. http://saharafoley.com/creativia-publishing-free-books-from-february-1st-thru-the-14th-2017-creativia/

Relaunch of my Recipe Book.

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I’m adding an extra blog today to announce the imminent relaunch of my recipe book, called Viv’s Family Recipes.

These recipes have been gathered by my family and friends over the 20th century and give an insight into the kind of foods we ate from 1909 to the present.

Some of these recipes we would not do today, either due to their high fat content, or the long time it takes to cook them, but they are interesting, nonetheless.

There are many more modern recipes in the book though, that I use on a regular basis.

I have also given a bit of information about the people who gave me the recipes and there are some old-fashioned Hints and Tips, too.

Watch this space for when it will be available.

 

 

Charity Begins at Home?

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I am responding to a post by Clancy Tucker that he posted on his blog, https://clancytucker.blogspot.com/. It was about The Peace Corps set up in 1961 by President Kennedy. The idea was to get young people to go abroad to countries that needed help and give that aid. Someone made the comment that he did not think there would be many volunteers from the current generation as they don’t seem to be into volunteering.

Be that as it may, my thoughts went to people here in the UK, not usually the young, who are against foreign aid. They often quote the Bible, although how many of them know they are doing so I’m not sure.

What they say is ‘Well, Charity begins at home, so we shouldn’t be sending all this money abroad in foreign aid. We should be spending it on our own people.’

They are interpreting this saying as ‘Charity begins (and ends) at home. This is not how I see it at all.

My interpretation is twofold.

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 I see it as a message to parents to teach their children about kindness and love. If the parents don’t show kindness, love and helpfulness in the home, then the children won’t learn it. Thus, Charity begins at home, and as the children grow up with such a loving and caring background, they will then be able to extend that love to others.
 Then there is the other side of the same coin. If you cannot be charitable to those you live with, you cannot be charitable to those outside your immediate family.

That is how I see the saying. Unfortunately, too many disagree with me and rail against the help we send to poor countries.

Please leave any comments below.

Next week, as it’s the first Tuesday of the Month, I’ll be posting the next instalment of Asphodel’s story.

An Exciting Read

I am reviewing Dissolution by C.J.Sansom today. I bought this book because I read the third Shardlake book, having bought it in a Charity Shop, and enjoyed it immensely. I decided I like the character and wanted to know more about him, so  bought  the first two. I’ve yet to read the second one. I’ll review it when I do.

Review of Dissolution by C.J.Sansom

Blurb

It is 1537, a time of revolution that sees the greatest changes in England since 1066. Henry VIII has proclaimed himself Supreme Head of the Church. The country is waking up to savage new laws, rigged trials and the greatest network of informers ever seen. And under the orders of Thomas Cromwell, a team of commissioners is sent throughout the country to investigate the monasteries. There can only be one outcome: dissolution.

But on the Sussex coast, at the monastery of Scarnsea, events have spiralled out of control. Cromwell’s Commissioner, Robin Singleton, has been found dead, his head severed from his body. His horrific murder is accompanied by equally sinister acts of sacrilege.

Matthew Shardlake, lawyer and long-time supporter of Reform, has been sent by Cromwell to uncover the truth behind the dark happenings at Scarnsea. But investigation soon forces Shardlake to question everything that he hears, and everything that he intrinsically believes …

Review

This is the first book in CJ Sansom’s Shardlake series and I gave it five stars.

Shardlake is a lawyer at the time of Henry VIII. He is not what one might call a traditional hero. He is a hunchback whose infirmity often troubles him. He is also regarded with suspicion and superstition by those around him, but he is a clever man.

C,J,Sansom has captured the period very well in this work. There is a very real fear amongst the people that the new Protestant religion is threatening them if they are not seen to fully embrace it. The characters he has created are very believable with all the foibles of humanity throughout the ages.

The book is very well written and moves along at a fast pace, carrying the reader along with it. There are clues as to the murderer if the reader can manage to piece things together. I didn’t, and so was surprised at the ending.

I am looking forward to reading the next book in the series.

If anyone wishes to make a guest appearance on my blog, please message me. I would be only to pleased to welcome you.